POW/MIA Recognition Day

POW/MIA Recognition Day is observed on the 3rd Friday of September each year. We remember those who were Prisoners of War (POW) and those that are Missing in Action (MIA) along with their families. In 1970, the National League of POW/MIA Families asked that a Flag of remembrance and recognition of POW/MIA designed that the United States promise to Never Forget POW’s and those that are still missing or not accounted for.

Newt Heisley designed the POW/MIA Flag with the silhouette of his son in mind, the flag bears a white disc in a black silhouette, a watch tower with a guard on patrol and a strand of barb wire, with white letters POW and MIA with a white 5 point star in between. “You Are Not Forgotten” written in white. There is no trademark or copyright for this because it is used not for profit but for awareness.

milpow35n_-00_powmia-flag-3x5ft-nylon-double-sided_3On March 9, 1989, the White House flew this Flag on National POW/MIA Day. The League of POW/MIA Flag is the only flag ever displayed in the United States Capitol Rotunda. Since 1982, the POW/MIA Flag is the only other Flag ever to fly over the White House (besides Old Glory) to be a constant reminder of America’s POW/MIA’s from ALL wars including our present time.

Passage by the 105th Congress of Section 1082 of the 1998 Defense Authorization Act required that the League’s POW/MIA flag fly six days each year: Armed Forces Day, Memorial Day, Flag Day, Independence Day, National POW/MIA Recognition Day and Veterans Day. It must be displayed at the White House, the U.S. Capitol, the Departments of State, Defense and Veterans Affairs, the headquarters of the Selective Service System, major military installations as designated by the Secretary of the Defense, all Federal cemeteries and all offices of the U.S. Postal Service. In addition to the specific dates stipulated, the Department of Veterans Affairs voluntarily displays our POW/MIA flag 24/7. The National Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Korean War Veterans Memorial and World War II Memorial are now also required by law to display the POW/MIA flag daily, and most State Capitols have adopted similar laws, as have local governments nationwide.

This year we will be attending The Wall South POW/MIA Ceremony at Veterans Memorial Park here in Pensacola, Fl. I do not know what to expect but I will be there in support and sending my Prayers and thoughts. Today give a moment of silence to those POW/MIA’s. Fly your POW/MIA Flag.

YOU ARE NOT FORGOTTEN

**Jacquie

VJ Day

Am flagVictory Over Japan Day. The United States and the Allied Forces won victory over Japan during World War II. On August 15, 1945, just days after the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were hit by the annihilating atomic bombs from American B-29 plane Enola Gay on August 6 & 9, 1945 consequently. This marked the end of World War II. The official surrender was not signed until September 2, 1945 aboard the USS Missouri, which was anchored in Tokyo Bay. General Douglas MacArthur, along with the Japanese foreign minister, Mamoru Shigemitsu, and the chief of staff of the Japanese army, Yoshijiro Umezu, signed the official Japanese surrender. President Harry S. Truman declared September 2nd as VJ Day.

Some Gave All We observe this on the second Monday in August. VJ Day or Victory Day is not a widespread “holiday.” Rhode Island is the only state that officially still celebrates this memorial. We stay strong in our country because we carry and hold our history in many ways. I am raising my flag in honor of those that came before me. The POW’s, the MIA and the KIA, the members of all who served the United States and her Allies during this time in our history. Raise your flag! Raise them all, the American Flag, the POW/MIA Flag, the Some Gave All Flag and your Flag For the Fallen. Rhode Islanders raise your state flag because there is always HOPE. Fly them proudly!

~Jacquie